University of Utah v. Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Defendants-Appellants (“Max Planck”) appeal a decision of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts, which found that this case was not “exceptional” within the meaning of 35 U.S.C. § 285 and thus denied Max Planck’s motion for attorney fees. The district court did not abuse its discretion. We therefore affirm.

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TVIIM, LLC v. McAfee, Inc.

TVIIM, LLC (“TVIIM”) sued McAfee, Inc. (“McAfee”) in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California for infringement of U.S. Patent No. 6,889,168 (“’168 patent”). A jury determined that McAfee did not infringe the ’168 patent and that the ’168 patent was invalid. After the jury verdict, TVIIM filed motions for judgment as a matter of law (“JMOL”) and for a new trial. The district court denied both motions, and TVIIM filed this appeal challenging the jury verdict and the district court’s denial of its post-verdict motions. We affirm because substantial evidence supports the jury’s findings of non-infringement and invalidity under a uniform construction of the relevant claim terms, and the district court did not abuse its discretion in denying a new trial.

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Bayer Cropscience AG v. Dow Agrosciences LLC

Bayer appeals the district court’s award of attorney fees to Dow under 35 U.S.C. § 285. The district court awarded attorney fees to Dow upon finding that the case stood out from others and was thus exceptional. Because the district court did not abuse its discretion in finding the case exceptional and awarding fees, we affirm.

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Mentor Graphics Corp. v. EVE-USA, Inc.

The present appeal arises from litigation in the District of Oregon between Mentor Graphics Corp. (“Mentor”) and Synopsys, Inc., Synopsys Emulation and Verification S.A.S., and EVE-USA, Inc. (“EVE”) (collectively, “Synopsys”).1 Mentor asserted several patents against Synopsys, including U.S. Patent Nos. 6,240,376 (“the ’376 patent”), 6,947,882 (“the ’882 patent”), 6,009,531 (“the ’531 patent”), and 5,649,176 (“the ’176 patent”). Synopsys asserted two patents against Mentor—U.S. Patent Nos. 6,132,109 (“the ’109 patent”) and 7,069,526 (“the ’526 patent”).

The ’376 patent was the only patent tried to the jury. Prior to trial, the district court granted summary judgment barring Synopsys from challenging the ’376 patent’s validity because of assignor estoppel. It also granted Synopsys’ motion in limine precluding Mentor from introducing evidence of willful infringement. The jury found in favor of Mentor and found damages of approximately $36,000,000. Synopsys appeals the infringement verdict, the damages award, and the summary judgment of assignor estoppel. Mentor cross-appeals the motion in limine regarding willfulness.

The district court granted summary judgment on the remaining patents prior to trial. It held that Synopsys’ ’109 patent was indefinite and Synopsys’ ’526 patent lacked patent-eligible subject matter. Synopsys appeals both decisions. The district court also held that the claims of Mentor’s ’882 patent lacked written description support and its infringement allegations relating to the ’531 and ’176 patents were barred by claim preclusion. Mentor cross-appeals both decisions.

We hold there was substantial evidence to support the jury’s infringement verdict regarding the ’376 patent and affirm the district court’s denial of judgment as a matter of law. We affirm the damages award. We affirm the summary judgment that assignor estoppel bars Synopsys from challenging the validity of the ’376 patent. We reverse the summary judgment that Synopsys’ ’109 patent is indefinite. We affirm the summary judgment that Synopsys’ ’526 patent lacks patent-eligible subject matter. We vacate the motion in limine precluding Mentor from presenting evidence of willful infringement. We reverse the summary judgment that Mentor’s ’882 patent lacks written description support. Finally, we reverse the summary judgment that Mentor’s infringement allegations regarding the ’531 and ’176 patents are barred by claim preclusion.

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Nidec Motor Corp. v. Zhongshan Broad Ocean Motor, LLC

The present appeal arises from an inter partes review (“IPR”) involving Zhongshan Broad Ocean Motor Co. Ltd., Broad Ocean Motor LLC, and Broad Ocean Technologies, LLC (collectively “Broad Ocean”) and Nidec Motor Corp. (“Nidec”). Broad Ocean petitioned for IPR of claim 21 of Nidec’s U.S. Patent No. 7,208,895 (the “’895 patent”). The Patent Trial and Appeal Board (the “Board”) instituted the IPR and found that claim 21 was anticipated by U.S. Patent No. 5,569,995 (“Kusaka”). Nidec appeals that decision to our court. Because the Board’s decision is not supported by substantial evidence, we reverse.

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Thales Visionix Inc.. v. United States

Thales Visionix, Inc. (“TVI”) appeals from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims (“Claims Court”) judgment on the pleadings holding that claims 1–5, 11–13, 20, 22–26, 32– 34, and 41 of U.S. Patent No. 6,474,159 (“’159 patent”) are directed to patent-ineligible subject matter. Thales Visionix, Inc. v. United States, 122 Fed. Cl. 245, 257 (2015). We reverse the Claims Court’s determination for all claims and remand for further proceedings.

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Comcast IP Holdings I LLC v. Sprint Communications Co.

Comcast IP Holdings I LLC (Comcast) sued Sprint Communications Company LP, Sprint Spectrum L.P., and Nextel Operations, Inc. (collectively, Sprint) for infringement of, among other patents, U.S. Patent Nos. 8,170,008, 7,012,916, and 8,204,046 (collectively, Low Patents), which are generally directed to the use of computer network technology to facilitate a telephone call (phone call or call). After a jury trial, the jury found that Sprint’s handling of certain phone calls infringed claims 1, 13, and 27 of the ’008 Patent, claim 45 of the ’916 Patent, and claims 90 and 113 of the ’046 Patent, and awarded Comcast a $7.5 million damages award. The district court then denied Sprint’s motion for judgment as a matter of law (JMOL), or in the alternative, for a new trial, and added prejudgment interest to the damages award. Sprint has appealed various rulings from the district court. Because we see no error in these rulings, we affirm the district court’s entry of judgment against Sprint.

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Meiresonne v. Google, Inc.

Michael Meiresonne appeals from the final inter partes review (“IPR”) decision of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“Board”) holding that claims 16, 17, 19, and 20 of U.S. Patent No. 8,156,096 (the “’096 patent”) are unpatentable under 35 U.S.C. § 103. For the reasons discussed below, we affirm.

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Intellectual Ventures I LLC v. Erie Indemnity Co.

Intellectual Ventures I LLC and Intellectual Ventures II LLC (collectively, “IV”) appeal from a final decision of the United States District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania finding all claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,510,434 (“’434 patent”), U.S. Patent No. 6,519,581 (“’581 patent”), and U.S. Patent No. 6,546,002 (“’002 patent”) ineligible under 35 U.S.C. § 101, and dismissing IV’s infringement claims of the ’581 patent for lack of standing. For the reasons discussed below, we affirm-in-part, vacate-in-part, and remand-in-part.

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Prism Technologies LLC v. Sprint Spectrum L.P.

The jury in this case found Sprint Spectrum L.P. liable to Prism Technologies LLC for infringement of U.S. Patent Nos. 8,127,345 and 8,387,155. The jury awarded Prism $30 million in reasonable-royalty damages under 35 U.S.C. § 284. The district court denied Sprint’s posttrial motions, and it also denied Prism’s motion for additional monetary relief for times after the period Prism said was covered by the jury verdict. Sprint appeals, and Prism cross-appeals. We affirm.

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